GI189: Probate Real Estate Investing with Sharon Vornholt

Sharon VornHolt began investing in 1998 and was originally a rehabber and a buy-and-hold landlord. When the market crashed in 2008; she became an “accidental wholesaler” but, her expertise is in probate investing.

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Announcer:
Welcome to the Global Investor Podcast, a show that focuses on helping foreign investors enter the lucrative US real estate market. Host Charles Carillo combines decades of real estate investing experience with a professional background in international banking to interview experts in all areas of US real estate investing. Now, here’s your host, Charles Carillo.

Charles:
Do you have money sitting in the stock market? And you’re worried about it or worse. You have money sitting at the bank, not keeping up with inflation. My name is Charles Carillo, founder and managing partner of Harborside Partners. And since 2006, I’ve been investing my money and my family’s money into income producing properties. These are real assets, real properties with real addresses that produce real cash flow. At Harborside Partners, we provide passive investors who love real estate with a turnkey investing solution. If you want to put your money to work in real estate, but can’t find deals, don’t have the time to get funding in. The last thing that productive people want to do is manage real estate. We find the deals. We fund the deals and we manage the tenants, the termites and the properties. Partner with us at investwithharborside.com. That’s investwithharborside.com. Go to investwithharborside.com. If you love real estate, you like the idea of passive income and believe that income producing properties will appreciate over time. Go to investwithharborside.com. That’s investwithharborside.com.

New Speaker:
Welcome to another episode of the Global Investors Podcast; I’m your host Charles Carillo. Today we have Sharon VornHolt. She began investing in 1998 and was originally a rehabber and a buy-and-hold landlord. When the market crashed in 2008; she became an “accidental wholesaler” but, her expertise is in probate investing. So thank you so much for being on the show, Sharon.

Sharon:
Well, thanks for having me, Charles.

Charles:
So you have a very interesting background. You’ve been investing for multiple decades. Please tell us about your background, both personally and professionally prior to getting involved in real estate investing.

Sharon:
Well, you know tell people I was the oldest of four children. My dad was a general contractor, so by the default, I was the best behaved. And so I would go around with him on his jobs. He did commercial renovations primarily you know, medical facilities and things like that. So that’s where I got my initial start in real estate. But prior to becoming an investor, I actually, well, I worked in the medical field for a long time and then I opened a home inspection company. I did that for 17 years and about seven or eight years into the home inspection company, you know, we dealt with a lot of realtors and I had a realtor come in and say, do you want to go to a R meeting? And I said something like, what’s a R meeting? Because at that time I didn’t know that you could do real estate another way than being an agent.

Sharon:
Hmm. So I went to that meeting and it was just fascinating. We have a, a large real estate investing group here. And even back then this is really dates me 1998, we had probably 500 people in the room in at Louisville, Kentucky. So it was just fascinating to me. So I invested part-time for about 10 years, you know, doing a flip or two. I’ve kind of, I call it the slow bit steady, slow bit steady path. And then when 2008 came, I said enough, you know, I could see the writing on the wall and I was done with home, the home inspection business. So I just then started investing full-time and that’s really just how it happened. But if you remember 2008, nobody could get a retail mortgage. Yeah. So I had these houses and I’m thinking, what the heck am I going to do? Am I going to rehab them, hold them for God only knows how long, maybe be forced to rent them. I didn’t wanna do that. So that’s when I called up some local investors and said, I’ve got these properties. Would you want to buy them? And that’s exactly how I got into wholesaling. I had never in all that time ever wholesaled a single deal.

Charles:
Interesting. Yeah. It’s, it’s, people don’t understand, I don’t think how like drastic 2008 was. And when I tell people, I mean, I started investing in with a three family in the end of 2006. And by the time I was buying a second one in the end of 2008, and this is like Lehman was going down, this is like a month before Madoff. Mm-Hmm. <Affirmative> like came out all this stuff at the end of 2008 and everybody I went to like speak to the real estate agent I used in 2006. And not only were they not like licensed anymore, like they were completely out of it. And your licensed last for like two years. So it’s like that’s how dramatic it was, was like everybody like cut ties af and it was just mm-hmm. It was a bloodbath. I mean, anybody that was in it and stuff just sat on the market for months if he couldn’t like years. Mm-Hmm. If he couldn’t get an f h a mortgage on it. Cause that’s the only thing really that was happening. Yeah. It was just crazy.

Sharon:
It was crazy. And it was that, that’s one thing I do love about real estate investing. Those you can pivot on a dam. And I tell peop people say, well, was it hard? And I, for me it wasn’t. But I had a almost, well, about a decade of experience. I knew investors that, here’s the key, that still had W2 jobs, had good jobs, but had thriving investing businesses and they were able to withstand the holding period on the properties and they weren’t completely opposed to renting them out. And that was something I did not wanna personally put all that money into a rehab, have a nice house, pretty house, and in that market where people were losing their jobs like crazy. I mean, it was, like you said, it was a bloodbath back then. And but I learned at that time, two, my investors that I knew in my area, they changed their strategies.

Sharon:
It didn’t matter if they were doing small multi families or single family homes. Sure. They, they said, well, before they bought a property, they had to know that it would cash flow if they got stuck with it. So I changed my model because back then, I mean, if it was a flip and you had a great profit, you didn’t necessarily worry about was it a rental? If it wasn’t, would it Cash flow was a rental because that was never your exit plan. Your plan was to sell the property, make a chunk of cash and go on. But that changed in 2008. You had had to, and I, I, I tell my investor friends, one of them in particular who was an agent, he really schooled me on that. And he said, I can’t buy these anymore unless they cash flow. Well, in case I get stuck with them over a couple of years because we didn’t know what was going to happen. Did we? We, we didn’t know

Charles:
When you were doing wholesaling. It was whenever I speak to people that have done wholesaling through this time, they had it usually, you know, you see now it’s like they have all these formulas, you know, 65% my, all this kind of stuff you see in these programs. But it’s a much different formula when you’re in something that you could be catching the knife dropping. I mean, how are you, how is your, I mean like obviously you’re just buying it where not really worried about after repair values. It’s only if it can cash flow. Is that kind of your mentality? Cause that’s what other people are doing?

Sharon:
Well, no, I still did after repaired value and I still did all the repairs on every wholesale as if I were going to do it. And that’s why I think I was successful because your reputation rides on whether or not you give someone a good deal. Now they’re going to do their own numbers. And that’s where wholesalers have gotten a, admittedly a bad rap in recent years. They didn’t always do their homework, but I didn’t as though I were going to keep the property or, you know, as if I were gonna rehab the property. And then I looked at the cash flow and I would have to say, okay, they’re going to look at this from cash flow. So it had to meet both criteria. And to be honest, sometimes they did just didn’t work. Now, I also had a couple of landlords on my list and they would, you know, landlords, they don’t always, they’re not going to figure the new roof necessarily.

Sharon:
If it’s a, a few years down the road, they’re going to buy on a different criteria. Not at least these small, smaller single families. I call ’em maybe C properties, B, B minus C properties. They’re buying on a little bit different criteria. There was one house that I bought that had naughty pine everything. I don’t know if you remember naughty pine? Mm-Hmm. <Affirmative>, yeah, God, awful looking stuff. Cabinets, walls, everything. For me, all I could could see was how much was it gonna cost me to rip all that out and fix it for him, it was like a landlord’s dream. It was indestructible. He didn’t do a thing to that house and he rented it for years and then he sold it. So you have to know your, you have to know who your buyers, you have to know who they are, what do they want, what, what do they need to make it be a good deal for them.

Charles:
Mm-Hmm. Yeah, definitely. For sure. The in Naughty Pine 20, cuz my parents had a small beach cottage that had nty pine in it. My mom wanted to always remove it, and then someone came in and was like, no, no, no. This is beautiful. You gotta keep it. My mom’s like, oh, okay. Like, we’ll keep it <laugh>. Yeah. but it’s, anyway. Yeah, no, that, that makes perfect sense. And it’s also, it’s a completely different rehab too. Yes. If I’m buying from you and I’m a flipper and I’m gonna put this in three months on the market versus I’m, you know, I’m gonna do a minor rehab and rent it. Right. You know what, know what I mean? So it’s, it’s you completely different how mean, how much you’re gonna invest into it and completely different of how your returns are gonna be. So it’s exactly. It’s very, very interesting. The other thing too, before we kinda transition off this point is I imagine you’re gonna deal with a lot with short sales and at back at this time, were you, were you finding properties that were underwater that people are getting out of? Or I mean, what did you have to deal with? Did you deal with anything that like that or? No,

Sharon:
I, I didn’t deal with a lot of short sales at Charles. One of my skills was through both of those businesses was marketing and I went for the low hanging fruit. Yeah. I’ve always been an off market person rather than m l s. And while I worked on a couple of short sales, I found them to be very troublesome, a very long process. Oftentimes the people that came out and I would do, having had a home inspection company and, and been a rehab, I was good at repairs and I would say, this needs to be done and this house has mold and it’s gonna be this much money. And they’d go, oh, no, it’s not that bad. You know? So I just thought we’re on two completely different pages <laugh> so Well,

Charles:
It’s not that bad. Yeah,

Sharon:
Yeah. Well, it’s not that bad. No. On, on a quad level, all four flows. Flores, it’s not that bad. Yes. She was like, I tell people she looked 13, I’m sure she wasn’t 13, but it was like she, she didn’t understand. So I’m, I’ve always been, let’s go for the easy, let’s go for the easy deal. So I just kept marketing and it was like literally the whole world was on sale back then. Yeah. What a time to buy.

Charles:
Yeah, my I had a property manager years back. He was just like, it’s not mold, it’s mildew, <laugh>, mildew, <laugh>. I was like, oh, this guy. But anyway. So let’s talk about like your, the lead sourcing. So for over a decade, like probate leads have been your number one lead source. I mean, how did you recognize this niche? Did you recognize it back during the great recession and you kind of jumped on it then? Mm-Hmm.

Sharon:
<Affirmative> 2008 is when I discovered probates. And I, I would like to tell you I had some grand plan for doing that, but it was by accident <laugh>. I found a couple of properties that happened to be probates, and I went, well, wait a minute. How does this all work now? There were no trainings, there was no education. I mean, that was a long time ago. And I had to figure it out myself. I had to figure it out, what’s the process? And luckily, you know, I had a, a, a group of people in the real estate world and, but, but at the same time, they helped me figure out pieces, but I wasn’t so forthcoming that I wanted to really share my secret source of endless stream of leads. So it took me a while, but I figured out the process. I figured out how to work with these people, and I figured out really what is the secret sauce to probates.

Sharon:
And that is that they have a problem, they have a legal problem that they have to take care of that involves property, and we are uniquely suited to help them with this problem. If it’s, if it’s a great problem, it, our property is going to be listed on the m l s, but if it needs work or updates when this is pretty common with probate properties, they might have a new roof, a new furnace, new windows and metal cabinets and orange shade carpet. So they’ve taken care of the big things, but they have not done any cosmetics. They have done, they have not done deferred maintenance either. So you can get a very structurally sound property with some of the big things done, but it needs a complete overhaul.

Charles:
So are you able to explain the probate process a little bit and kind of how your strategy would tie in with it?

Sharon:
Yeah, the probate process understand that there are 3,300 plus counties in the US and each county has a little bit different way that probate leads are sourced. I wish there was a magic button or a magic place. You go to, like in most most places you’ve got the m l s for listed properties. There’s no such thing for probates. So the, but in general, the states will have a little, little bit different process, but it’s basically the same process. So someone passes away and then the family or someone is going to open up the estate. That’s a legal process. You can do it yourself. I don’t recommend it because whenever, from my perspective, whenever I had a problem with the deal, it’s because the family tried to do it themselves. You can actually go get the paperwork and do it. But so they will open up the estate and the there will either be a will, in which case the have a said, Charles is my executor Charles is the person I trust to administer my estate and see that it all gets done properly.

Sharon:
Or if there’s no will, that’s called intu state. And the judge, the court or the court will appoint someone called an administrator and they have the same duties and responsibility. So this person I like to call the decision maker, this is the person that can sell the property. So once someone passes away, the estate is opened mm-hmm. <Affirmative>. And then you, once the estate is opened and the executor, the administrators has been formally appointed, there’s a paperwork that goes with that, then that’s when the assets in the estate are sold. And that includes any property. So it’s right about at the middle of this process. So the, the estate is opened, the assets are sold, the creditors are paid, and then the heirs get what’s left. So it’s a very straight line process. But if you see the heirs are at the bottom, now you might say who are, who are the creditors?

Sharon:
Were there anybody that has money owed to them? It could be a home you know, a mortgage or a HeLOCK. Many elderly people get a reverse mortgage or a HeLOCK. They also might have credit card bills or other types of things like that. It’s certainly hospital bills, nursing home bills, funeral expenses, and attorney fees. So the, the heirs who sit below the bottom of all of this, and they’re waiting to get whatever it is that they’re inheriting, all of this stuff has to happen before them. So once they are able to sell the assets in the estate, which is most often property, it might be boats or cars, but it, it’s, you know, whatever the assets are. But when they, they’re very motivated to get the property sold, they just, they don’t want the property. They just want the money that’s sitting in the property. Mm-Hmm. So it’s a very lucrative niche, and you will get some of your most lucrative deals from probates.

Charles:
Interesting. Yeah. I’ve always seen that a lot that you’ll see errors just don’t wanna deal with it, and especially if they’re not living in the area or anything like that mm-hmm. <Affirmative>. And there’s very rarely you get an air that’s like a real estate investor mm-hmm. <Affirmative>. So it’s one of those things that they’re kind of just wiping their hands. They don’t care what their parents paid, they just want money in their pocket and go on about their life.

Sharon:
Sos what I, that’s said, they, they want to go on with their life. And you can imagine whatever your life looks like, Phil, if you’re a listener, you might have children, you might have pets, you might have soccer games, you know, you’ve got responsibilities. And then in the middle of everything that you do in your regular life, you’ve got this thing, this estate that has to be settled. It’s a, it’s a process. You can have a probate attorney help you, but you’re gonna be in intimately involved in settling this estate and, and people, they don’t wanna do it. And if the house needs repairs or updates, sure they could do that, put their money in it and update the property and put it on the m l s. They don’t wanna do that. Mm-Hmm. <Affirmative>, they, they took, they just don’t wanna do it. They want, they want just wanna be done.

Charles:
So when you’re, they publicly list the probate, is that correct? So that you’re able to, and then that’s where you’re able to make contact with the a with the heirs, is that correct?

Sharon:
It will be listed somewhere now in many states the information is available online. I’m, I’m not a computer gen genius, but I know that if you have an open a p i for data in your area, it can be pulled online. Many areas of Chicago, Dallas, Texas, or Houston, Texas, many areas have the ability to just pull it right off of line. Now and where I am in Louisville, Kentucky, we don’t have that ability that, that, that system is not in place, but it’s in the newspaper mm-hmm. <Affirmative> and you only need once a month back where the, like the sheriff’s sales are, where all the legal announcements are, it’ll be back there and you only need four pieces of information to work in probates. You need the name and address of the deceased and the name and address of the personal representative. Whoever the decision maker is the executor or the administrator, that’s who you’ll be writing a real estate contract to. And that’s the same whether it’s a commercial property, whether it’s a residential property, because there are properties and commercial properties where they have not done estate planning that end up in the same situation.

Charles:
Hmm. Interesting. And do you find it when you’re reaching out, obviously since it’s very lucrative for you, I imagine there’s just, they have minimal other people that are doing the same thing compared to just like sending off postcards to people, Hey, do you wanna sell your house and stuff like this?

Sharon:
There, there’s definitely less competition because there are a lot of mindset issues around working with probates. And that’s something I talk about all the time. You know, you as an investor, you need to understand that these folks have a problem and we are problem solvers. That’s what we do. At the end of the day, we solve problems that involve property. So they’re looking for a solution. And but many people are reluctant to go into it because they feel like they’re taking advantage of someone. Like they’ve, they’re there at the worst time of their life, or they, they think they don’t know what to say to these people. Well, folks, they’re just people, you know, they’re just like you and me and that have a problem. So you’ve got to first fix your mindset, and then you need to understand their mindset, which we’ve talked about.

Sharon:
Where are they? They just wanna get it over with. So once you, once you understand that, then you just send them, I don’t recommend sending postcards at all, because people get upset. If you reference the estate, I recommend that you send a, a direct mail letter computer generated mail merge letter that says, dear Charles, I’m contacting you about the property at and, and saying that you understand that it’s part of an estate because I will guarantee you if you omit it, and you can do it that way, they’re going to call up and say, where did you get this information? How did you know about this? And then you are explaining why your marketing to them, when deep down, you know, someone’s mom passed away. So for me, I, I have very few problems over all these years. I mean, I’ve had a couple of complaints and I make it my goal to talk to these people and make them understand that we’re not trying to upset anybody.

Sharon:
But a lot of people are, they are set to inherit these properties or have to deal with these properties and they don’t wanna do it. Yeah. So once you get fewer complaints than what you think, so talking about competition, if you are looking on the m l s or one of the commercial sites for properties, you’ve got all of tho the competition out there from all the other people that are looking. Now it, when you talk about direct mail statistics, about 81% of your deals, not your calls, but your deals will come at or beyond your fifth mailing. So direct mail marketing is a thing. You need to just stay in the game. But most of your competition will quit honor before the first or the second mailing honor be you know, second to third mailing, they just quit. They don’t get an immediate million dollars in the door.

Sharon:
They don’t get an immediate a hundred calls, so they just quit. So by the third mailing, they’ve already given up. So if they got, if you had 30 letters initially that went out, almost everybody’s quit. But you, and, and a couple more as you go down the road and you’ve got to be there. Probate is a thing that takes a little while and it takes a little while for people to get ready mentally to deal with their parents’ belongings. They’re gonna have to clean out that house. And it’s a, that is a big stickler. It’s a big problem for people throwing away mom’s favorite couch or dad’s recliner. They just, they don’t want to, they don’t wanna do it. So there’s really no getting there first in probates. You just need to go, go the, go the journey, and you have so much less competition than in other niches.

Charles:
So you offer probate coaching and a course. I mean, other than the staying power, which is important, I think in, in, in many, if all not all businesses, what differentiates your very successful students from the rest?

Sharon:
Well, I insist that they learn the process. So my course is drip down a module a week. So it’s six modules plus all the bonus modules. So it’s going to take five weeks start to finish for them to get that six module. And the reason I do that is because people want to listen to the first module, get a little bit of information, then they wanna jump over here and start marketing, which I understand I’m kind of that person that likes to fast track things, <laugh>, but I don’t want them to spend a bunch of money and do this wrong and then be unhappy with, with the, with me. So I know that they need to know some basic terminology. They need to understand all this mindset stuff, and they need to know how to market to probates because it is different. You have to know that you’re overriding message to be you know, here’s what I do, here’s how I can help you, and I’ll be here when, whenever you’re ready.

Sharon:
So there’s no hard sell and there’s no, let’s hurry and get it done. And once you learn that and you realize that you’re building a relationship with these people, we month after month, because you mail everybody every month, so long as the house is available, once you get that, you can build a very successful probate investing business because every single month there’s a new group of leads this month, next month, it’s a cycle of life the month after that. So you’re building a list of people depending on your population. I have a friend who’s in Chicago, he says they have 800 probate leads a month in my area. More like by the time you sort through and pull out the ones that are really low prop, you know, value properties or too high value properties you’re gonna end up more with 70, 80, maybe, something like that.

Sharon:
So it’s a big, big difference million. But look at the population of Chicago and those big metropolitan areas as opposed to where I am, like more in the million range, and I don’t know where you are, but it’s all relevant Yeah. To, you know, how many people, but let’s say you’re adding eight, let’s say you’re adding even 80 people to your list a month. You know, that’s what, 900 plus in a year leads that are bound by law to sell the property. So you just, you’re, you’re cleaning up your list all the time, every month you’re adding new people on. So every, every month as you go along, somebody’s in that fifth month where, okay, we gotta get our act together and we’ve gotta move on with this this whole process.

Charles:
The other benefit I wanna, as I’m listening to your, your process is that these homes, let’s, let’s be honest, like older people’s homes usually have some repairs and renovations that might be required compared to a new owner. Mm-Hmm. <Affirmative>. So that’s going to really, it’s gonna divert them from the course of real estate agent mls mm-hmm. <Affirmative> to someone like yourself. Yes. Which as I put two and two together, I realize why this is such a great thing. So the thing though is that that if you are if you’re doing that, is that, that, I imagine that’s a big selling point that you’re bringing to them mm-hmm. <Affirmative>, you know, it’s cash offer and there’s no other mm-hmm. <Affirmative>.

Sharon:
Yes. And you can say one thing I always write in my contract, because I know from personal experience when my mom passed away things that were important to her, like her 20 year old sofa, I always go back to that example. She loved that sofa. It was a quality sofa, but did it have any monetary value? No. Could I throw it in a dumpster? No. I had to have somebody else do it. So the thing I always write in the contract is you can take what you want from the property, mementos pictures, and you know, if you’ve got anti whatever it is you want, and you can simply walk away and leave the rest. So when we talk about repair lists, that’s always a repair item. Assuming I were going to wholesale, it wouldn’t make any difference if I were going to keep it. That’s still, you look at it and you go, okay, it’s one dumpster, four men in a day, or it’s two dumpsters. You know, you just, it’s just a line item on the repair list like you would have on any other property.

Charles:
Yeah. Yeah. It’s quick thing. My, my, when my grandmother passed away years back, it was the, I saw the process happen and unfold. So yeah, it’s, it’s definitely it happens like that. When you what are common mistakes I, I guess you would see probate real estate investors make from, you know, where they can be more successful and where kind of they’re making mistakes in their process?

Sharon:
I think consistency is a big one. You have to understand that a lot of these people, they open the estate and that might be two months after someone passed away. It might be a year after they passed away. They have to get mentally ready to do it. So, but know that when they do open the estate, they’re raising their hand to say, I’m ready to sell the estate. And many investors are, you know, sell the property. So many investors will try to hurry them along the process, and you just can’t do it. This is something that they have to do themselves, and you just interject yourself into their life. Once they open the estate, that’s when you start marketing to them. And again, you just let them know, I, I know this, you might not be ready to sell the property, but this is how you can reach me.

Sharon:
If you have any questions and when you’re ready to sell, I think they, they really make the mistake of not nurturing these people Hmm. Long enough. It’s a simple, it’s as simple as choosing the right words. It is as simple talking to these people when you go to their property. It’s just saying, you know, look around for visual clues. Was the dad a golf or the golf clubs in the corner, you know, the dad has passed away. Maybe you might say, is the dad the golfer or is the mom the cook? There are a lot of cookbooks. So you strike up a conversation, you let them tell their story. Like, you might, I might be talking to you Charles, and you’d say, yes, my dad was a golfer. Look over here at the pictures how he was in all these tournaments. They just start to tell you about their person.

Sharon:
Yeah. And this is, you just simply listen. And then when the, you know, you, you’ll know when the time is right. Then you say, would you like to show me the property? But a lot of investors, they, they’re, they’re uncomfortable with this process. They they think it’s kind of strange, but that’s when you get your best deals because understand that they won’t always pick the person that gave them the best price on the house. Yeah. They’ll pick the person they’re most comfortable with. Mm-Hmm. <affirmative>, the other opportunity in probate is what I call time and circumstances. Properties. If the executor is on, let’s say they live in LA and they are a big, they have a big job, they’re very busy, and they’re person that passed away lives in New England, they simply do not have the desire or the time to go back and forth. So you might get a house that actually needs very little repairs. They are educated, they know that they’re taking a hit on the price. They just want it taken care of. Yeah. And they don’t wanna do it. So I called those time and circumstances properties, <laugh>.

Charles:
Yeah. No, I, I’ve definitely seen that happen with people. So that’s, it’s very interesting. What do you think are the main factors that have contributed to your success, Sharon, over the years?

Sharon:
I, I think I just never gave <laugh>. I just never gave up. But I do think marketing, I think marketing for any niche in real estate and every type of deal is a little bit different. You have to learn marketing and branding because marketing is how you get leads, but branding is why they choose you. Mm-Hmm. <Affirmative>. And so once you understand that and you’re able to position yourself, but I think you, you simply cannot succeed if you don’t find a marketing channel that works for you. And for some people, I think networking is a great channel. I’m a big direct mail fan because that’s the way you reach off market deals. Hmm. You can set it, you can automate it, and then you can do what you do best, which is putting together deals. It’s a little bit different in the multi-family space, but I heard someone say one time that they were talking about, well, I don’t wanna use this particular site. That’s where deals go to die. That’s where apartment, you know, which one probably I’m talking about. But they that’s an opportunity to go and structure a deal from someone who’s just fed up. Mm-Hmm. <Affirmative> you know, you’ve gotta, I think you’ve gotta find the opportunity in when other people are walking away from certain situations.

Charles:
That’s great information.

Sharon:
I’m not, I’m not saying to make a deal, try to make a deal a deal, that’s not a deal. But I’m saying that people often, they just step over stuff. Nah, that’s gonna be hard. I’m not gonna do that.

Charles:
Yeah. Yeah. I, one of my first deals I ever invested into in larger, they it was found on that website you’re talking about mm-hmm. <Affirmative>, and they went back through it like two or three times mm-hmm. <Affirmative> and, you know, it was just kind of how it is. You know, you, you, you looked at it and you’re like, kind of put it aside and then you realize, wow, this is, it’s actually pencils. Mm-Hmm. <Affirmative>. And it was a fantastic deal. It sold three years later. So Hawk, can our listeners learn more about you and your business, Sharon?

Sharon:
The best way is to though they can listen to the podcast, let’s talk real estate investing, or they can come over to the blog, which has links off to everything. The Louisville Gals real estate blog has a link off to the, to the podcast. You know, the podcast is available wherever you listen. And then they can always reach out to me at [email protected] and they can you know, certainly send me questions or, I love suggestions for shows too, folks, if you’ve got a suggestion for a show.

Charles:
Awesome. Well, thank you so much for coming on today, Sharon, and looking forward to connecting with you here in the near future.

Sharon:
Same here, Charles. Thanks for having me.

Charles:
Have a good day.

Charles:
Hi guys! It’s Charles from the Global Investors Podcast. I hope you enjoyed the show. If you’re interested in get involved with real estate, but you don’t know where to begin, set up a free 30 minute strategy call with me at schedulecharles.com. That’s schedulecharles.com. Thank you.

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About Sharon Vornholt

Sharon Vornholt is the owner of Innovative Property Solutions in Louisville, KY.  She began investing in 1998 and was originally a rehabber and a buy-and-hold landlord. However, when the market crashed in 2008, she became an “accidental wholesaler.”   Sharon loves helping real estate investors build a profitable business by specializing in off-market deals.  She is also passionate about empowering and educating women who are interested in real estate investing.

Sharon is best known as a marketing and branding expert for real estate investors and her expertise in probate investing. She has helped hundreds of people refine their brand and create customized marketing plans that work no matter what their investing strategy is

Sharon is the creator of the Louisville Gal’s Real Estate Blog, the popular podcast “Let’s Talk Real Estate Investing, and her signature course “Probate Investing Simplified”.

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